Saturday, January 2, 2016

My Resolution For 2016: Go Out To The Movies!


Psychology Today.com
What kind of resolution is that, to go out to the movies? It sounds like way too much fun!

My husband and I made this solemn vow two weeks ago after seeing “The Bridge of Spies,” starring Tom Hanks, which was our first test of the neighborhood cinema, Ciné Issy.

The cinema got a B+: It's close, within walking distance; cheap at about 7.30 euros a ticket; and shows great, first-run movies. However, the seats aren't comfy, and you can't reserve on-line.

We went there again last week to see the latest Star Wars movie, "The Force Awakens," though this time in French. But that was not a problem. This is one action movie where the dialog isn't worth much. At all.

After that we vowed to see whatever was showing at Ciné Issy, unless we were out with friends or to a party.

How can “going out to the movies” possibly be a resolution? How about if I say I want to go out more often with my husband? That I want to improve my French? Have something interesting to talk about at the water cooler or among friends?

Those sound like resolutions, a statement about how I want to improve myself. But the experts say that in fact resolutions should be simple and specific—and written down. (Done!) 

I'm hoping that our simple and specific resolution will go a long way to filling our more serious and lofty goals.

Tomorrow we're on to see a French comedy called “Le Grand Partage” (“The Roommates Party”). The story is that it's a cold winter, and to house the homeless, the French government decrees that homeowners with spare rooms have to accept “roommates.”

The Hollywood Reporter gave the movie a terrible review, but I'll keep an open mind. Besides, it looks like fun!

For some reason, it has taken us two years to test out neighborhood movie house. Could it be that the best resolutions are right under your nose?

Rose Marie Burke, an editor and journalist, writes a blog about her personal insights into life in Paris. After 20 years in the City of Light, she still calls her native Pittsburgh "home."